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Social and Economic Impact of Influenza

References

Label Authors Title Source Year
1

References in context

  • For example, the WHO estimates that there are 3–5 million cases of severe influenza illness, resulting in 250,000–500,000 deaths annually in the industrialized world.
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KM Sullivan. Health impact of influenza in the United States. Crossref. Pharmacoeconomics 9 (Suppl 3) (1996) (26 - 33) 1996
2

References in context

  • For example, the WHO estimates that there are 3–5 million cases of severe influenza illness, resulting in 250,000–500,000 deaths annually in the industrialized world.
    Go to context

T Szucs. The socio-economic burden of influenza. Crossref. J Antimicrob Chemother 44 (1999) (11 - 15) 1999
3

References in context

WW Thompson, DK Shay, E Weintraub, et al.. Mortality associated with influenza and respiratory syncytial virus in the United States. Crossref. J Am Med Assoc 289 (2003) (179 - 186) 2003
4

References in context

  • Estimated averages of annual excess morbidity and mortality in Europe during influenza epidemics.
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  • The influenza attack rate varies from year to year as does the virus strain.
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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Key Facts about Influenza and Influenza Vaccine. (www.cdc.gov/flu/keyfacts.htm)
5

References in context

  • Influenza may cause secondary bacterial pneumonia and exacerbations of underlying chronic medical conditions that can result in hospitalization or even death.
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KL Nichol, J Wuorenma, T von Sternberg. Benefits of influenza vaccination for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk senior citizens. Crossref. Arch Intern Med 158 (1998) (1769 - 1776) 1998
6

References in context

R Zimmerman. Lowering the age for routine influenza vaccination to 50 years. Am Fam Physician 60 (1999) (2061 - 2066) 1999
7

References in context

WH Barker, JP Mullooly. A study of excess mortality during influenza epidemics in the United States, 1968–1976. Am J Epidemiol 115 (1982) (479 - 480) 1982
8

References in context

KM Neuzil, PF Wright, EF Mitchel, MR Griffin. The burden of influenza illness in children with asthma and other chronic medical conditions. Crossref. J Pediatr 137 (2000) (856 - 864) 2000
9

References in context

E Levy. French economic evaluations of influenza and influenza vaccination. Crossref. Pharmacoeconomics 9 (Suppl 3) (1996) (62 - 66) 1996
10

References in context

  • The increasing cost of health care has prompted research to quantify the cost of illness due to influenza.
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  • France.
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TD Szucs. Influenza. The role of burden-of-illness research. Crossref. Pharmacoeconomics 16 (Suppl 1) (1999) (27 - 32) 1999
11

References in context

  • The direct costs of influenza have been estimated in a number of different studies.
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RB Couch. Influenza: prospects for control. Ann Intern Med 133 (2000) (992 - 998) 2000
12

References in context

  • The direct costs of influenza have been estimated in a number of different studies.
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CDC. Prevention and control of influenza. Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). MMWR Recomm Rep 50 (RR-4) (2001) (1 - 46) 2001
13

References in context

  • The direct costs of influenza have been estimated in a number of different studies.
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PA Patriarca. New options for prevention and control of influenza. Crossref. J Am Med Assoc 282 (1999) (75 - 77) 1999
14

References in context

  • During influenza outbreaks, there is a significant rise in absenteeism in the working population.
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  • During influenza outbreaks, there is a significant rise in absenteeism in the working population.
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  • Numerous studies have been conducted around the world estimating the indirect cost due to influenza-like illness (ILI) in the work place.
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  • In a study of families with school-aged children during an influenza season compared with a non-influenza winter season, there was a significantly greater total number of illness episodes, febrile illnesses, analgesic use, school absences, parental absenteeism and secondary illnesses among family members.
    Go to context

KL Nichol. Cost-benefit analysis of a strategy to vaccinate healthy working adults against influenza. Crossref. Arch Intern Med 161 (2001) (749 - 759) 2001
15

References in context

  • During influenza outbreaks, there is a significant rise in absenteeism in the working population.
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A Elder, B O'Donnell, E McCruden, et al.. Incidence and recall of influenza in a cohort of Glasgow health care workers during the 1993–4 epidemic: results of serum testing and questionnaire. Crossref. Br Med J 313 (1996) (1241 - 1242) 1996
16

References in context

  • During influenza outbreaks, there is a significant rise in absenteeism in the working population.
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J Wilde, J MacMillan, J Serwint, et al.. Effectiveness of influenza vaccine in health care professionals: a randomised trial. Crossref. J Am Med Assoc 281 (1999) (908 - 913) 1999
17

References in context

  • During influenza outbreaks, there is a significant rise in absenteeism in the working population.
    Go to context

  • Numerous studies have been conducted around the world estimating the indirect cost due to influenza-like illness (ILI) in the work place.
    Go to context

JH Dille. A worksite influenza immunization program. Impact on lost work days, health care utilization, and health care spending. AAOHN J 47 (1999) (301 - 309) 1999
18

References in context

  • Numerous studies have been conducted around the world estimating the indirect cost due to influenza-like illness (ILI) in the work place.
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JA Mauskopf, SC Cates, AD Griffin. A pharmacoeconomic model for the treatment of influenza. Crossref. Pharmacoeconomics 16 (Suppl 1) (1999) (73 - 84) 1999
19

References in context

  • Numerous studies have been conducted around the world estimating the indirect cost due to influenza-like illness (ILI) in the work place.
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C Bridges, W Thompson, M Melzer, et al.. Effectiveness and cost-benefit of influenza vaccination of healthy working adults. Crossref. J Am Med Assoc 284 (2000) (1655 - 1663) 2000
20

References in context

  • Numerous studies have been conducted around the world estimating the indirect cost due to influenza-like illness (ILI) in the work place.
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V Kumpulainen, M Makela. Influenza vaccination among healthy employees: a cost-benefit analysis. Crossref. Scand J Infect Dis 29 (1997) (181 - 185) 1997
21

References in context

  • Numerous studies have been conducted around the world estimating the indirect cost due to influenza-like illness (ILI) in the work place.
    Go to context

KL Nichol, et al.. The effectiveness of vaccination against influenza in healthy, working adults. Crossref. New Engl J Med 333 (1995) (889 - 893) 1995
22

References in context

  • Numerous studies have been conducted around the world estimating the indirect cost due to influenza-like illness (ILI) in the work place.
    Go to context

DS Campbell, MH Rumley. Cost-effectiveness of the influenza vaccine in a healthy, working-age population. Crossref. J Occup Environ Med 39 (1997) (408 - 414) 1997
23

References in context

  • Workers who have ILI and either stay at work or return to work before the illness has disappeared have reduced effectiveness (lower productivity) while working.
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AS Monto, KM Sullivan. Acute respiratory illness in the community. Frequency of illness and the agents involved. Crossref. Epidemiol Inf 110 (1993) (145 - 160) 1993
24

References in context

  • Workers who have ILI and either stay at work or return to work before the illness has disappeared have reduced effectiveness (lower productivity) while working.
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M Keech, A Scott, P Ryan. The impact of influenza and influenza-like illness on productivity and health care resource utilisation in a working population. Crossref. Occup Med 48 (1998) (85 - 90) 1998
25

References in context

  • Houston Surveillance and European evidence, assuming an overall attack rate of 10%.
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  • Houston Surveillance and European evidence, assuming an overall attack rate of 10%.
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E Burckel, T Ashraf, J Galvao de Sousa Filho, et al.. Economic impact of providing workplace influenza vaccination. A model and case study application at a Brazilian pharma-chemical company. Crossref. Pharmacoeconomics 16 (1999) (563 - 576) 1999
26

References in context

  • In a study of families with school-aged children during an influenza season compared with a non-influenza winter season, there was a significantly greater total number of illness episodes, febrile illnesses, analgesic use, school absences, parental absenteeism and secondary illnesses among family members.
    Go to context

KM Neuzil, et al.. Illness among schoolchildren during influenza season: effect on school absenteeism, parental absenteeism from work, and secondary illness in families. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 156 (2002) (986 - 991) 2002
27

References in context

  • Intangible costs include quality of life and impairment of function and performance.
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WH Barker, H Borisute, C Cox. A study of the impact of influenza on the functional status of frail older people. Crossref. Arch Intern Med 158 (1998) (645 - 650) 1998
28

References in context

MI Meltzer, NJ Cox, K Fukuda. The economic impact of pandemic influenza in the United States: priorities for intervention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. Emerg Infect Dis 5 (1999) (657 - 671) 1999
29

References in context

NJ Cox, SE Tamblyn, T Tam. Influenza pandemic planning. Crossref. Vaccine 21 (2003) (1801 - 1803) 2003
30

References in context

DP Schopflocher, ML Russell, LW Svenson, TH Nguyen, I Mazurenko. Pandemic influenza planning: using the U.S. Centers for Disease Control FluAid Software for small area estimation in the Canadian context. Crossref. Ann Epidemiol 14 (2004) (73 - 76) 2004
31

References in context

JK Medema, YF Zoellner, J Ryan, AM Palache. Modeling pandemic preparedness scenarios: health economic implications of enhanced pandemic vaccine supply. Crossref. Virus Res 103 (2004) (9 - 15) 2004

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